Religious Identity and Political Mobilization: A Comparative Study of Hindu and Muslim Leadership in British India

Authors

  • Dr. Ghulam Shabbir Assistant Professor, Department of History & Pakistan Studies, University of Gujrat, Gujrat, Punjab, Pakistan
  • Dr. Sharaf Ali Associate Lecturer, Department of Political Science & IR, University of Gujrat, Gujrat, Punjab, Pakistan
  • Khizar Jawad Assistant Professor, Department of History/Pakistan Studies, F C College University Lahore Punjab, Pakistan

DOI:

https://doi.org/10.35484/pssr.2024(8-II-S)23

Keywords:

Freedom Movement, Hindus, Muslims, Leadership, Religious Identity

Abstract

This study investigates the impact of religious identity on political mobilization through a comparative analysis of Hindu and Muslim leadership in British colonial India. The objective is to understand how religiously inspired political movements emerged and their implications on identity construction and political processes. The background highlights the significance of religious identity in shaping political strategies and the need to fill gaps in comparative literature. Methodologically, the research employs archival research, oral testimonies, and cross-temporal comparisons to identify patterns and divergences in political actions. The results reveal that both Hindu and Muslim leaders utilized religious symbols and ideologies to mobilize support, with Hindu leaders merging religious and nationalist sentiments, while Muslim leaders focused on asserting Muslim identity. The study recommends adopting a multi-dimensional analytical approach to understand the complexities of historical processes, which can provide valuable insights into contemporary communal dynamics and the role of religious identity in political trajectories.

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Published

2024-05-27

Details

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    PDF Downloads: 16

How to Cite

Shabbir, G., Ali, S., & Jawad, K. (2024). Religious Identity and Political Mobilization: A Comparative Study of Hindu and Muslim Leadership in British India. Pakistan Social Sciences Review, 8(2), 270–280. https://doi.org/10.35484/pssr.2024(8-II-S)23